6 Reasons to Visit New Zealand Every Year

One trip to see them all.

Have you ever seen the movie Lord of the Rings? The film was shot in one of the most picturesque countries in the world, New Zealand. And just like how the film has portrayed it, the country is charming, if not magical.

New Zealand’s unspoilt scenery, from its breathtaking glaciers, lush green forests, quaint rolling hills and crystal clear lakes has attracted millions of tourists. The country is also compact and easy to travel from its northern to southern islands thanks to budget ferries.

Renting a campervan or a motorhome is a great way to explore this small country. You can pick them up in two of New Zealand’s largest cities, Christchurch and Auckland.

Whether you have been to New Zealand multiple times or a would be first time visitor, here are six reasons why this place deserves to be on your bucket list:

  1. Hobbit Village

Relive the scenes from the Lord of the Rings Trilogy and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey in the village of Matamata. Take photos of Bag End, home of Frodo and Bilbo Baggins. The hobbit-sized town also has 43 other hobbit holes; some of which you can enter.

Roam the area and you will notice some familiar places from the two films like the double arched bridge, the mill, and the infamous Party Tree. Run along the green pastures and rolling hills of The Shire.

Not far from Matamata to the east, lies Wairere Falls. Plunging at a stunning height of 153 metres, it is the highest waterfall in the North Island. Wairere also has a scenic walking track and a panoramic view of the Waikato plains and valley from its lookout.

Hobbiton_Village_New_Zealand

"Hobbiton" by Tom Hall available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/tom_hall_nz/15189132237 under a Creative Commons Attribution. Full license at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ BY Tom Hall

  1. Glacier Hikes

New Zealand is famous for its snow-capped mountains and glaciers, especially in Southern Alps in the South Island. Leave your footprints in the snow while you hike through many glacial patterns.

Choose between the equally famous neighbour glaciers of Fox and Franz Josef, both in Westland Tai Poutini National Park. Leave your rented motorhome at one of the many campervan sites at the base of the mountain. Book a tour to one of these  informative guided helicopter walks.

Other things to do while in this area include riding cross-country in quad bikes, kayaking the mirror-like waters of the nearby glacial lake, and getting close with kiwis (the animal, not the people) at the Westcoast Wildlife Centre.

  1. Māori Culture

The Māori people is perhaps among  the most passionate in the world. Just listening to their “haka” war dance, popularised by the All Blacks Rugby team, lets out a fire inside your heart. The film, Whale Rider, has perfectly portrayed the life and traditions of this vital Kiwi tribe.

Nowhere in New Zealand can you experience Māori culture more genuinely than in Rotorua. The indigenous people of New Zealand are welcoming and gladly let visitors in their homes in the spirit of manaakitanga (hospitality).

Grab a seat as locals perform their evening cultural dances or join classes on how to carve and weave traditional Maui patterns. Satisfy your hunger with steamy hangi food that is slowly cooked through thermal heat.

Aside from the unique local culture, Rotorua is also a haven for adrenaline-pumping extreme sports. The surrounding lush green forest has trails perfect for all mountain bikers, rushing rivers draw many kayakers and river rafters, and bush walks are perfect for all-terrain bike rides.

Maori_Culture_New_Zealand

" Maori" by bradhoc available athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/bradhoc/9712285341 under a Creative Commons Attribution. Full license at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ BY bradhoc

  1. Whale Watching

New Zealand is famous for its herds of sheep grazing on lush grasslands, but there is a rarely seen animal that swims in its waters- whales. Half of the world’s whale species like Blue whales, Humpback whales, Southern right whales (Tohora), Pilot whales and Sperm whales are in NZ.

The little seaside town of Kaikoura, 150 kilometres  of Christchurch, is one of the best places to catch a glimpse of these gentle giants.  Take a photo of them slapping their tails or spouting water through their blowholes.

Other places where you can catch a glimpse of whales are in Bay of Islands where there is a large population of bottlenose dolphins, Whakatane which has a sunny warm climate, and Hauraki Gulf where you can spot orca whales and Bryde’s whales.

5. Waitomo Glowworm Caves

Are you fond of stargazing? Now, imagine doing that inside a dark cave, and instead of stars you are looking at glowworms clinging on the roof.

Waitomo Glowworm Grotto in the Northern Island is probably the best memory you will have out of your journey in New Zealand. The cave is a quiet repose that brings a magical moment as if you are frozen in time as you gaze into the living lights.

For the more adventurous,  try the nearby Lost World cave tour where you get a chance to rappel 100 metres  down a cave wall, followed by a dry carving adventure. The cave has a mystical vibe because of an eerie mist amplified by the roar of the Mangapu river echoing throughout its cavern.

Waitomo_Glowworm_Caves_New_Zealand

"Glowworms catching food - 2012-01-28" by Kristina D.C. Hoeppner available athttps://www.flickr.com/photos/4nitsirk/6781019705 under a Creative Commons Attribution. Full license at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ BY Kristina D. C. Hoeppner

6. Marlborough Region

Toast a glass of exquisite wine as you explore the wine region of Marlborough. Close to eighty-percent of wine products in New Zealand is produced in this region including the renowned Sauvignon Blanc.

There is nothing like the seafood dining experience in one of the region’s restaurants and wineries. The regional dishes in Marlborough has components of honey, wild meat, oils and nuts produced from its

Aside from wine, the region is also famous for its historic sites and serene coastline. At Omaka Aviation Heritage Centre, they show old plane models from the World War I and II era. Meanwhile, the sea-drowned valleys of Marlborough Sounds offer great kayaking experiences for beginners and pro paddlers.

 

These six things will surely make you want to go back to New Zealand every year. Hire a campervan or motorhome if you want to explore this wonderful country in an inexpensive and convenient way.

Things to do in Melbourne During Summer Season

You can joke about Melbourne’s weather all year round, but not during summer.

The world’s “most liveable city” can rival, if not surpass, the summer experience that other places in Australia has to offer. Melbourne’s magnificent landscape, hidden laneways, sporting grounds and pristine beaches are sure to captivate you.

Melbourne is also a great starting point for any road trip like the Great Ocean Road. Going around the city is easy, especially if you rent a motorhome or campervan that serves as your home on the road.

If you still do not have  the slightest idea what to do when you’re in Melbourne this summer, here are 10 things that will surely make your trip memorable:

1. Sip a Cup of Melbourne Coffee

Melburnians love their coffee, perhaps a bit more than everyone else. If you are a coffee lover yourself, Melbourne presents an opportunity to taste several coffee brews around the world. Simply head over to cafes like Breakfast Thieves, Chez Dre or Kettle Black to have a great breakfast with an equally great tasting cup of coffee.

Melbourne_Coffee

"Coffee time with a magic at St Ali South" by Katherine Lim available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/ultrakml/10698833933 under a Creative Commons Attribution. Ful license at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ BY Katherine Lim

2. Tour the CBD via the Circle Tram

Riding Melbourne’s free tram is the most convenient way to explore the city’s business district. The tram also plays an audio commentary that discusses the details of city landmarks and its attractions like the Princess Theatre, Docklands, Melbourne Aquarium, City Museum and Parliament House. To ride in one, wait at any tram stop along the tracks and look for the City Circle sign.

3. Hang Out at the Summer Night Market

Spend your nights with tasty food and good drinks while watching splendid acts from street performers and musicians. Held every Wednesday night from November to March, the Summer Night Market gathers around 200 vendors that serve Middle Eastern, Spanish, Indian and Vietnamese food. Catch this feast of world flavours at Queen Victoria Market in Elizabeth Street.

4. Watch Films at The Moonlight Cinema

Watch a great movie under the night sky while picnicking in the grassy hillside of the Royal Botanic Gardens. Catch your favourite flicks from new releases, cult movies and even retro films. On some occasions, movie goers can also see a mass flight of bats. This year, tickets cost $14 for children and $19 for adults.

5. Catch a Game at the Melbourne Cricket Ground

There is nothing like watching an exhilarating game of cricket or Australian footy. Buy a ticket for your favourite team’s game and cheer for them on the day of their match. MCG also hosts tours that introduce the stadium’s rich history and day-to-day operations. The “G” remains the largest stadium in Australia, with a seating capacity of 100,000.

Melbourne_Cricket_Ground

" CWC Aus v Eng at the MCG" by Tourism Victoria available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/visitmelbourne/16545211875 under a Creative Commons Attribution. Full license at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ BY Tourism Victoria 

6. View the City at the Top of Eureka Tower

If you want to see Melbourne in its entirety, head over to Eureka Tower. On the 88th level is a viewing deck that gives you a bird’s eye view of the city. The highest building in the southern hemisphere,  its top ten floors is also plated in  24-karat gold. Tickets are sold at $19.50 for adults and $11.00 for children 4-16 years old. Kids under 4 years are free.

7. Picnic at the Royal Botanic Gardens

You don’t have to leave Melbourne to experience nature. Head over to the Royal Botanic Gardens and immerse yourself in 38 hectares of landscaped gardens with a large collection of plants from around the world. The infamous Heritage Walk tour allows you to see the  Gardens through the eyes of its traditional Aboriginal inhabitants. Many of the plant species in the garden also have displays that provide information about them.

8. Swim at St. Kilda Beach

Summer is never complete until you have spent a few days at days at the beach. Just 6 kilometres from the city centre lies St. Kilda Beach which is popular for its sweeping views of Port Phillip. St. Kilda’s serene foreshore has an extensive network of boardwalks and paths ideal for walking, cycling, jogging and inline skating.

9. Take a Selfie at the Arty Alleyways

Melbourne is home to many artists and it is not only in galleries and exhibits that you can delight yourself in visual art. Just head over to one or two laneways in the main city grid and you will stumble upon some of the best street arts in the world. A galore of colourful murals, starting from Hosier Lane in the north, gives life to the once shortcut passages of the city.

Melbourne_Street_Art

"Melbourne street art." by Andrew available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/63168233@N06/7547584298 under a Creative Commons Attribution. Full license at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ BY Andrew

10. Visit the Animals in Melbourne Zoo

Get lost  in the wilderness of Melbourne Zoo. Just less than 4 kilometres  from the heart of the city, stands this wildlife sanctuary that is home to over 250 animal species. Come and see all your favourite animals from lions, tigers, elephants, orangutans and even Victoria’s iconic little penguins and Australian fur seals.

 
These are just a few of the activities you can do in Melbourne this summer. To fully enjoy your stay in this magnificent city, travel aboard a motorhome or campervan. This option is not only cheaper than staying in a hotel, it also gives you schedule flexibility.

Planning your Campervan Holiday in New Zealand

New Zealand is a fantastic destination for a self-drive holiday in a motorhome for a number of reasons.

First of all, the distances are not that great, so to drive from one location in your campervan to the next won’t take long. This will allow you to spend more time at each fantastic destination.

Another reason is that New Zealanders themselves love the camping lifestyle and there are plenty of options for those undertaking their own campervan holiday in “the Land of the Long White Cloud”. There is even a national organisation dedicated to camping  – click here.

Camping Our Way NZ

And then of course, there are the stunning destinations that you can travel to in your campervan that you book through Salamanda Travel!

Akaroa_Harbour NZ

Last but not least are the friendly locals. New Zealanders are known as a very friendly nation who will be only too happy to strike up a conversation and give you advice if they can.

So, you’re planning a trip to New Zealand and are considering hiring a campervan … we agree, it’s a great idea! But what do you need to know?

Free Airport Transfer

First of all, our suppliers offer a free transfer both from the airport and back after your journey is over. When you book a campervan with Salamanda Travel the airport transfer from either Auckland or Christchurch is included free of charge. On arrival at the airport, you simply call the number we have advised, and someone will meet you at the airport and bring you to the branch office to collect your motorhome or campervan.

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Where to Stay?

So the next thing is – where to stay?

Here there are plenty of options throughout New Zealand – caravan parks and campgrounds, National Parks, or so-called “freedom camping”.

Caravan Parks and Holiday Parks

Caravan Parks are the most convenient places to stay and enjoy your campervan holiday in New Zealand. In addition, prices are quite reasonable. However we do recommend you plan your route and book ahead, especially in the busy season which is during the New Zealand summer and holiday period from late November to March.

Private campgrounds and caravan parks offer plenty of facilities to make your campervan stay easy, such as access to power and water, so you can fill up your water tank and recharge the battery on your motorhome or campervan. They also offer facilities such as shower and toilets, laundries, camp kitchens, and sometimes campfire sites that will make your stay that much more enjoyable. Some campgrounds offer recreational facilities such as tennis courts, swimming pools, and recreation rooms with table tennis and other games.

Campgrounds and caravan parks are usually located close to attractions such as tourist sites and attractions, beaches, and so on.

Coromandel_Peninsula_Panorama

They are also a great way to meet other travellers and swap tales.

To find some options, this is a good place to start: Great NZ Accommodation Directory

Please also have a look through the following list and see if you can find something to suit you:

  • Family Parks New Zealand – this an independant group of holiday parks that provide a family atmosphere. For more information click here 
  • Kiwi Holiday Parks – these are highly recommended. For more information go here
  • Top 10 Holiday Parks – these offer affordable accommodation throughout New Zealand – go here
  • Holiday parks – a range of camping grounds here
  • Jasons – accommodation and camp sites – click here

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National Parks

The NZ Department of Conservation (DOC) manages more than 200 conservation areas throughout New Zealand, including National Parks. The conservation parks feature a range of appealing natural settings, from beach settings to forests or lakes, with each one offering a wide range of campgrounds and facilities.

These DOC campsites are a great place to call in with your campervan for the night and experience the natural wonders of New Zealand. Besides that, they offer very affordable rates and you will most probably meet like-minded travellers.

Bookings are required for the serviced campsites, and also for some of the standard campsites. Fees vary depending on where the park is situated and whether or not it is serviced.  Please visit the Department of Conservation and New Zealand’s National Parks website here for more information.

Milford_Sound NZ

Freedom Camping

It is still possible to “free camp” in many areas in New Zealand, except for areas that are signposted as no camping allowed. Please be careful when choosing your site, because if you camp in a prohibited area you may be fined.

Local authorities are responsible for free stays in their own region. We recommend you check with the local information centre before setting up for the night.

The other thing to consider is the battery power in your campervan. Campervans and motorhomes run on a dual battery system – one battery starts the campervan ignition and the other powers internal appliances. Approximately every second day you will need to recharge the battery, depending on usage. So it’s a good idea to plan to stay at a powered site at least some of the time.

Most importantly, be sure to clean up after yourself and not leave any litter. In recent times, some freedom campers have not done the right thing and this will ultimately lead to tighter restrictions on freedom camping.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call us and have a chat!

The Legendary Pacific Coast Road Trip between Sydney and Brisbane

Congratulations! You’ve booked a motorhome or campervan through Salamanda Travel and are looking forward to a self-drive holiday from Sydney to Brisbane (or Brisbane to Sydney). So the next thing is to find out what to do along the way. We will try and help you with that here.

Cheapa 6 Berth

The legendary Pacific Coast road is Australia’s national highway number one, stretches for approximately 1 000 km and is arguably Australia’s top tourist drive. On the way you will spot some signs showing the brown-coded scenic tourist route which points the way to some of the best beaches and most picturesque towns. It can be an adventure just to follow any of the Scenic Route drives without knowing where you will end up. Once there, you can visit local pubs and cafés – you never know who or what you’ll find. However, we also recommend planning some activities and places to visit before you start out on your road trip. Here is our list of some highlights along the way.

Blue Mountains
The Blue Mountains National Park is one of the most popular national parks in Australia and just a short trip west of Sydney. The most famous attraction in the park is the ‘Three Sisters’ rock formation. It’s a spectacular landmark, and highly recommended. Explore The Blue Mountains Bushwalks which are extensive and impressive. If you are looking for a more adventurous way to see the ‘Three Sisters’, you could ride the steepest passenger skyway in the world, the Scenic Skyway. Glide between clifftops and gaze at the rainforest canopy through the glass floor of the Scenic Skyway! Or go horse riding, and take one of the segway tours where you can discover the spectacular beauty of riding in the Blue Mountains in a different way.

Blue Mountains 2

Newcastle
A few hours drive north of Sydney, Newcastle is located in the heart of the Hunter Region and bordered by a stunning coastline with beautiful beaches. Take a dip in the “Bogey Hole” which was hacked out by convict labour in 1819. Once you see the Bogey Hole in real life you will realise what an achievement this was by the convicts. It was constructed by order of a commandant for his own personal bathing use.

Port Stephens
Further north again, Port Stephens offers a unique diversity of activities, especially for tourists. It is well worth discovering the ‘Great Lake Marine Park’, which is a 98,000-hectare marine reserve. You can also enjoy other water-related activities. The marine park was established by the NSW Government in December 2005, and has since developed into a stunning habitat full of diverse wildlife thanks to its rich variety of ecosystems. Go on a camel riding tour or a quad tour and experience the thrill of riding over the vast sand dunes of Port Stephens.

Port Macquarie
Further north from there, Port Macquarie is a bustling town with stunning beaches. Port Macquarie is known as the “Koala Capital” of Australia. Visit the Koala Hospital and Wildlife Park. There is a free Koala Hospital tour at 3pm every day.

Coffs Harbour
Heading towards the northern part of NSW is Coffs Harbour. No matter in what time of year you visit Coffs harbour, the area won’t fail to entertain and delight. Did you always want to travel to Holland and see how clogs are built? You don’t have to travel to the other side of the world – visit the Clog Barn to find a little piece of Holland in Australia. Take a leisurely walk around the model Dutch village with its miniature working windmills and working miniature railway. All the models are replicas of actual buildings in Holland. Visit Big Oma’s Coffee House, and taste some of the Dutch specialties, like croquettes, frikendellen and poffertjes.

Coffs Harbour has more to offer than just clogs. “Coffs” has some outstanding beaches, such as Gallows, Park Beach, Diggers, Sapphire, Emerald, Sawtell, Sandy and more. A popular attraction is the Big Banana,  one of the most photographed objects in Australia. Other attractions include a downhill taboggan ride, an ice skating rink and a waterslide.

Byron Bay

Byron Bay
On the way from Coffs Harbour to Byron Bay, make sure you visit South West Rocks and Scott’s Head along the way. They both have a caravan park overlooking beautiful beaches. Byron Bay iself is recognized as one of the homes of alternative lifestyle culture in Australia. Make a short scenic journey into Byron’s hinterland to Crystal Castle  to see a slice of the alternative lifestyle. In Byron Bay itself, you can hike to Cape Byron Lighthouse, the most easterly point in mainland Australia. It is definitely worth the walk for the amazing view. Don’t forget to try ‘Stand Up Paddling,  it’s one of the fastest growing sports, and there is no better place to try stand up paddling then in Byron!

Gold Coast
The Gold Coast is THE holiday destination for a lot of Aussies and tourists as well, due to the sunny subtropical climate, surfing beaches and plenty of nightlife, family entertainment, shopping and hotels. Apart from this, the Gold Coast has a lot of different theme parks, such as Dream World, Warner Bros Movie World, Sea World. Another popular attraction is the Tamborine rainforest skywalk. The skywalk is a great way of exploring the rainforest – during your walk you will be able to observe the diverse flora and fauna the rainforest has to offer from a birds eye view.

Brisbane Kangaroo Point lookout Brisbane

Brisbane
Your final destination is Brisbane – a town that offers plenty of things to do. At the Cultural Precinct at South Bank, visit the Gallery of Modern Art, the Queensland Museum, take the family for a swim at the “City Beach” at South Bank, or cruise over the river on the frequent ferries. Plan a trip down the Brisbane River on the special ‘Bat Cruise” to observe the flying foxes that take off each sunset to go foraging for fruit across Brisbane. There is also Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary at Fig Tree Pocket, just a short trip downriver by ferry where besides koalas you will see plenty of other Australian wildlife. The city itself offers plenty of shopping and historic buildings such as the Brisbane City Hall at King George Square, and then in the city on the river’s edge is the Brisbane Botanic Gardens. For more information, check out the Visit Brisbane website.

Australia in a Campervan – a weekend trip from Sydney

Finally, a free weekend! The typical travel recommendation for taking a holiday in New South Wales is to visit the beautiful city of Sydney! Climb the Harbour Bridge, take in the spectacular view of Sydney Opera House from the Manly ferry and surf at Bondi Beach.

But what about the locals who have already climbed the Harbour Bridge twice, who see the Opera House every morning on the way to work and who regularly surf at Bondi Beach? They want to leave the city on their free weekends, but where do they go?

Hop in a campervan you have booked through Salamanda Travel and get ready for a great weekend getaway, Sydney’s surrounding areas offer a variety of places to see and activities to escape from the fast pace of the city.

Our supplier’s Sydney campervan hire location is only 11 km from the city centre. Once checked in and after the vehicle show-through is complete, you are as free as a bird to start your adventure across this beautiful region.

Go whale spotting at Whale Beach – 50 minutes
Whale beach is a great place to relax and enjoy the scenery. It is beautiful and one of the least crowded of the northern beaches. The beach is hidden away south of Palm Beach and the approach to Whale Beach from either directions is spectacular. Go up to the cliff and you might see plenty of whales showing up during the sunset, don’t waste your money on whale watching cruises, just buy a $3 parking ticket.

Climb the Blue Mountains – 1 hour
The Blue Mountains national park is listed in the UNESCO World Heritage. The most famous attraction in the national park are the ‘Three Sisters’ rock formation. It is the most spectacular landmark, and definitely a must-see.  Explore The Blue Mountains Bushwalks which are spectacular. When you want a more adventures way to see the ‘Three Sisters’, you should catch the steepest passenger skyway in the world, the Scenic Skyway. Glide between cliff tops and gaze at the rainforest canopy through the glass floor of the Scenic Skyway! The Blue Mountains are easily accessible via Katoomba and only two hours from the harbour city of Sydney which will be easy with your campervan.

Hike the Royal National Park, Bundeena – 1 hour
The Royal National Park, know to locals as the ‘Nasho’ or ‘the Royal’, is the worlds second-oldest national park. It contains a wide variety of terrains and it is perfect for a bush-walk to see the fascinating plants or for a hike along the dramatic coastal cliffs. Pack your picknic and head down to Garie Beach in your Salamanda camper for a surf.

StarRV_PhoenixRV_4Berth_PicnicGo fishing at Jervis Bay – 1 ½ hours
Jervis Bay beaches are world famous for their white sands and crystal clear waters. Walk the beach at Jervis Bay beaches and witness for yourself the stunningly white — and uncrowded — beaches. If you like fishing you should visit Jervis Bay. It is well known for its abundance and variety of marine life, whether you fish on land or from a boat, there is a great variety of fish here.

Observe the the Kiama Blow Hole – 1 ½ hours
Kiama is an idyllic little town, with lots of nice cafés & unique shops. However the main attraction is the Blow Hole. Wait for high tide and the south-easterly winds for a spectacular 260 degree view. Don’t forget to follow the coast south, it is a pleasant walk to the little blow hole, which on some days is even better then the main blow hole.

Take a dip in the Bogey Hole – 2 hours
Newcastle is located in the heart of the Hunter Region and bordered by a stunning coastline with beautiful beaches. Take a dip in the Bogey Hole. The hole was hacked out by convict labour in 1819. Once you the Bogey Hole yourself you will realise what an achievement this was. It was constructed for personal use by order of a commandant.

Discover the ‘Great Lake Marine Park’ in Port Stephens – 2½ hours
Port Stephens offers a unique diversity of activities.  Discover the ‘Great Lake Marine Park’, which is a 98,000-hectare marine reserve. You can enjoy eco-tourism activities such as diving, snorkelling, surfing, swimming, take a boat tour or spot dolphins and whales. The marine park was established by the NSW Government in December 2005, and has since developed into a stunning habitat full of diverse wildlife thanks to its rich variety of ecosystems.
StarRV_AquilaRV_2Berth_CoupleLifestyle_Champagne-Get tipsy in the Hunter Valley – 3 hours
If you have a passion for wine, you should definitely visit the Hunter Valley. It is home to some of the oldest wine families of Australia. They produce a range of tempting wines that use traditional methods and techniques. Visitors describe the Hunter valleys as charming, romantic and picturesque. But remember, don’t drink and drive in your campervan. Give your campervan the afternoon off, there is a wide range of wine tours; which can pick you up and drop you back off to your camp site.

Surf & Golf at Mollymook – 3 hours
Mollymook is one of the South Coast’s most popular beaches. The golden stretch of sand has ideal conditions for experienced surfers and anyone else who is keen to learn to surf. Besides its gorgeous beach, Mollymook also offers two golf courses with absolutely spectacular views.

Ski the Snowy Mountain – 5 hours
Across all four seasons, the Snowy Mountain Australia’s ultimate playground is a true alpine wilderness and offers a long list of year-round activities. The roots of Australia’s Indigenous culture stretches back thousands of years. Immerse yourself in Aboriginal culture and take a Wiradjuri Wonders Tour in the Snowy Mountains. A must-do is one of the Segway Eco Tour, they offer the highest Segway tour in Australia at 1200m above sea level, a unique ‘off piste’  experience. In addition, visit the Yarrangobilly Caves. The location is divine; breathtaking scenery, kangaroos, fantastic bushwalks and spectacular rock formations. After you’ve visited the Caves, don’t forget a dip into the thermal pool.